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Doug Makes Stormy Nights Cozy

June 12, 2014
Published In: Power

​When Mother Nature's at her worst, EPCOR Power Linemen like Doug are at their best, out in the heart of the storm so your power goes on – and stays on.

Most of us start our work day with the buzz of an alarm clock, but when a storm hits our city it's a loud clap of thunder that lets him know it's time to get into work. As the leader of an aerial crew, Doug's team is one of many that respond to power outages during summer storms. Whether the outages are caused by lightning strikes, fallen trees or lines downed by strong winds, Doug is on the frontline of restoring power to the city.

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"You hear that first thunderclap, and you know you're going to get a call that night. You know you're going to be going in, but you don't know what you're facing until you get there." - Doug, EPCOR Power Services

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"You hear that first thunderclap, and you know you're going to get a call that night," says Doug. "You know you're going to be going in, but you don't know what you're facing until you get there."

After the initial call, Doug and his crew are dispatched to trouble areas around Edmonton. Sometimes the storm is still in its final throes when they arrive on the scene. Doug and his team have to keep an eye on the skies to make sure they don't get caught in the path of Mother Nature's fury.

"When we're working and we see the lightning coming closer, we make sure to get out of there," he says.

Aerial work adds an extra risk for the crew, and they have to make sure they come down before the lightning gets too close — as if working with up to 25,000 volts every day wasn't dangerous enough.

Despite the hazards, Doug likes the satisfaction that comes with making sure Edmontonians aren't without power for too long. While shifts can feel long, depending on the severity of the storm, he and his crew pride themselves on a job well done.

"We put the poles in, we put the wire up, we get the power back on. Then we keep on going," Doug says.